The Acoustic Guitar: A Compositional Report

Stages and Phases

Title The Acoustic Guitar

General statement

Entity identification

 

 

The acoustic guitar consists of multiple parts that work together to create sound. It has a hollow body that amplifies the tone created by the vibration of the strings when strummed or plucked. The important parts are the body, the fretboard, the sound hole, the captan, the tuning pegs, the strings, and the bridge.

The body of the acoustic guitar is considered to be very important as it provides the resonance that shapes the tone of the guitar as well as the volume.

The fretboard is commonly made from rosewood and has a number of metal frets embedded in it (20-24). Strings are pressed down behind the fret to change the note that the open string will produce. Most fretboards have marker inlays on the third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and twelfth frets; they function as q quick recognition indicator.

The sound hole is where the soundwaves made by the strings via the bridge saddle (see diagram) exit the body leading to what is ultimately heard.

The headstock, which is attached to the end of the guitar’s neck, houses the tuning pegs. It can also be where the guitar identification, i.e. brand, is.

The tuning pegs are attached to the capstan, which allows the strings to be lowered or raised in pitch. The capstan has the string tied through it.

The bridge is found between the hole and the bottom of the body. Its function is to allow the strings to pass over it and sit at a certain height, which is called the action.

Teaching Language in Context, Beverly Derewianka and Pauline Jones, Oxford, 2013

Acoustic guitar2

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