NAPLAN Writing Results from 2016 to reflect on

Click on the tabs at the top to explore to explore Year 3, Year 5 and Year 7 results

It will be important to prepare students for either a persuasive or narrative text. Exploring the difference between the two in structure and language use will help to prepare students.

Writing Rubrics and Descriptions of National Minimum Standards for Year 3, 5 and 7
Persuasive writing rubric-wq1m7k

Narrative writing rubric-15h1h50

NAPLAN Writing Resources from website:
https://www.nap.edu.au/naplan/writing

Content Descriptors and Achievement Standards – For reference when planning, assessing and reporting

Questions

I have recently been reading Kath Murdoch’s new book, The Power of Inquiry, and have gathered some different questioning techniques that I will be using this term with classes. Feel free to use what is useful to you.

Questions

NAIDOC Week

National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee
http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/ngarrindjeri-shorts/ZW0732A001S00

Shared Read Aloud this week:

Enora and the Black Crane by Raymond Meeks
This is a traditional story, based on Arone Raymond Meeks’ knowledge of the bush, the spirits who lived there and their laws as taught to him by his grandfather, a member of the Kokoimudgji group in Queensland.

Jandamarra’s Story
An important story belonging to the Kimberley people which focuses on one man’s resistance to colonisation.

The Burnt Stick by Anthony Hill
A poignant story from a young boy’s perspective of his removal from his mother and their group. A great insight for students into the trauma caused by the removal of children from their family and traditions.
A great companion read would be The Rabbits by John Marsden and Shaun Tan.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTvXe84UqIQ

Hope you get a chance to share some of these stories with your classes during NAIDOC Week.
Feel free to add comments to this blog post in response to your class’s discussion/ ideas.
🙂

Model of a Descriptive Report (basic Information Report)

 

Title Red-bellied piranha

General statement

Entity classification

The red-bellied piranha is a type of fish that lives in the Amazon River.

Description

Features

It has an orange belly, grey back, and very sharp teeth set in strong jaws. It grows up to 33 centimetres in length.

Diet

Behaviour

The red-bellied piranha hunts in shoals of 20-30 fish. They feed on a diet of fish, insects, snails, plants, and river animals. They hide in vegetation in order to ambush prey, and they also chase prey and scavenge for food. The younger, smaller fish hunt by day, and the older, bigger fish hunt at dawn and dusk.
Reproduction The female lays a clutch of up to 1 000 eggs.
Life expectancy Piranhas can live for about 100 years.

 

piranha-262575_1280

Teaching Language in Context, Beverly Derewianka and Pauline Jones, Oxford, 2013

The Australian Goldrushes: A Historical Report

Stages and Phases

Title The Australian Goldrushes

General statement

Identification

Time

Place

The Australian goldrushes are significant in Australian nineteenth-century history. The first verified discovery of gold was around Bathurst, New South Wales, in 1851. Goldfields were then established in areas around the nation. People came from all over the world with the intention of striking it rich. Between 1845 and 1896 Australia’s population more than doubled, going from 400 000 to 1 000 000 people.

Description

Environment

Accommodation

At first, goldfields were established in rough environments longside rivers. As the claims of success and wealth grew, the sites became busy. The surrounding ridges became huge campsites housing prospectors and their families as well as tradespeople attracted by other work prospects. People lived in tents at first; later, huts made from wood, canvas, and bark were common. Over time the goldfields became towns and cities. At the start of a goldrush site, there were very few roads, meaning that everything had to be carried in from the surrounding townships. As the site developed, people travelled on horseback or wheeled their possessions in barrows.

Transport

Employment opportunities

Nutrition and health

While it was the opportunity of striking it rich that attracted many, other people stayed for the other job opportunities. Mostly, the people who flourished at teh goldfields were the tradespeople selling food and equipment and the landowners, selling land to people for homes. The diigings also provided employment in services such as laundry, inns, and boarding houses, and even hospitals.

Health and hygiene became an issue on the diggings. People lived on a basic diet of damper, tea, and mutton, which didn’t provide the necessary nutrition and variety. Sewage was not correctly disposed of and, as a result, clean drinking and washing water became contaminated. In addition to this, diseases and epidemics were brought to the diggings by the people arriving from overseas by ship. While there were doctors and nurses, they could not deal with the numbers so many people died from illnesses such as dysentry and typhoid.

Historical significance of the goldrushes The goldrushes played an important role in building the Australian nation. They were responsible for diversifying an economy formerly based on wheat and sheep. The influx of immigrants contributed to a multicultural society. The heritage of the goldrush era is still apparent in many of the public buildings in cities such as Bathurst and Ballarat.

Teaching Language in Context, Beverly Derewianka and Pauline Jones, Oxford, 2013

The Acoustic Guitar: A Compositional Report

Stages and Phases

Title The Acoustic Guitar

General statement

Entity identification

 

 

The acoustic guitar consists of multiple parts that work together to create sound. It has a hollow body that amplifies the tone created by the vibration of the strings when strummed or plucked. The important parts are the body, the fretboard, the sound hole, the captan, the tuning pegs, the strings, and the bridge.

The body of the acoustic guitar is considered to be very important as it provides the resonance that shapes the tone of the guitar as well as the volume.

The fretboard is commonly made from rosewood and has a number of metal frets embedded in it (20-24). Strings are pressed down behind the fret to change the note that the open string will produce. Most fretboards have marker inlays on the third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and twelfth frets; they function as q quick recognition indicator.

The sound hole is where the soundwaves made by the strings via the bridge saddle (see diagram) exit the body leading to what is ultimately heard.

The headstock, which is attached to the end of the guitar’s neck, houses the tuning pegs. It can also be where the guitar identification, i.e. brand, is.

The tuning pegs are attached to the capstan, which allows the strings to be lowered or raised in pitch. The capstan has the string tied through it.

The bridge is found between the hole and the bottom of the body. Its function is to allow the strings to pass over it and sit at a certain height, which is called the action.

Teaching Language in Context, Beverly Derewianka and Pauline Jones, Oxford, 2013

Acoustic guitar2